Amanda Parshall Helps Travelers Navigate the Olympic Peninsula with Rainshadow Escapes

If you get the chance to see the Olympic Peninsula (my favorite spot in the Pacific Northwest), then you’re going to want to make the absolute most of your time. The area’s only sin is that there’s too much to see in a short time, unless you have a good game plan. Luckily, Amanda Parshall of Rainshadow Escapes is there to help you do that.

I found Rainshadow Escapes on Twitter and was immediately struck with jealously over the fact that I hadn’t thought of the business idea first. The feeling was short-lived, though. Parshall would have had a significant leg up on me in competition. She’s been in the travel business, leading people all over the world, for a long time.

What’s different about her current venture is that this time she’s focusing her expertise on the area she calls home, bringing a combination of personal and professional experience that you’re not going to find anywhere else.

I asked Parshall if she’d be interested in discussing her new business, the Olympic Peninsula, and Washington state’s beaches. She agreed.

Thanks for your time, Amanda, and for the beautiful photographs.

Interview with Amanda Parshall of Rainshadow Escapes

Northwest Nomad: What inspired you to start Rainshadow Escapes?

Amanda Parshall: I find that the best businesses start with a passion, and Rainshadow Escapes is no different.

For over 10 years, I worked as a Travel Coordinator for expedition travel, helping people to reach exotic places all over the world.  I loved that work. However, I started realizing that some of my most memorable travel moments happened in my own, impressive backyard: the Olympic Peninsula.

I also recognized that, while the Peninsula is one of the most special places on the planet, there is a real need to get the message out. Rainshadow Escapes is my platform for sharing this amazing region with the rest of the world, and to help everyone traveling here to discover the side of the Olympic Peninsula that will resonate the most for them.

Northwest Nomad: What are your personal favorite attractions along the Peninsula?

Amanda Parshall: For me, the Peninsula has it all: incredible scenery, abundant wildlife, endless opportunities for adventure and, most importantly, a deep history and culture.  There is a strong connection to the past here, a past that locals are prideful of, and that echoes through every aspect of daily life in the small towns and enclaves throughout the region.

Of course, a major draw for many people, including myself, is the vast and varied landscapes.  From beaches to mountains to rainforest, there is no shortage of places to lose yourself in solitude and pure beauty. I also love that you can truly get away from it all, but not be too far from civilization when the need for modern convenience arises.

It’s hard to deny the lure to the popular attractions (Hurricane Ridge, Lake Crescent, the Hoh Rainforest…the list goes on).  However, some of my personal favorite spots are a bit more off the beaten track, and show a side of the Peninsula that the main tourist route sidesteps.

Port Gamble, for example, is a captivating port town just minutes from the Hood Canal Bridge.  It’s a tiny town, but it’s big on history and charm, and is home to some great restaurant, shops and a wonderful logging museum.

The Peninsula is home to many little surprises like this, and those surprises are what I get excited to share with people.

Northwest Nomad: How do you sell wintertime travel along the Peninsula?

Amanda Parshall: It’s true that visitors dissipate quickly after the summer season is over, and the Peninsula becomes a different scene. This is not just a challenge, but a great opportunity for Rainshadow Escapes to highlight the benefits of traveling to the area in the off season (or what we would affectionately call, the “value season”).

Not only is it quieter, less crowded and cheaper to travel outside of the summer months, but every season has something unique to offer.  I am personally a shoulder season traveler, and right now we are in the height of one of my favorite times of year on the Peninsula: fall.  The autumn leaves are at the peak of color, days are clear and crisp, and area restaurants are serving up the bounty of the local harvests.

Winter is the perfect time to spend a relaxing few days on the coast, cozying up to a fire and watching the storms pound the surf from the comforts of your rental cabin.

And spring brings stellar wildlife viewing opportunities, allowing the best chance to see elk, bear and birds, among others. One of my goals with Rainshadow Escapes is to encourage people to experience the Olympic Peninsula in new and different ways, and to take advantage of these amazing seasonal opportunities.

Northwest Nomad: In addition to general travel, does Rainshadow Escapes work with specific interests, such as anglers, hunters, etc.?

Amanda Parshall: We don’t specialize in any specific type of travel. Our focus is to know all that the Peninsula has to offer, understand individual traveler’s interests, and match the two together. As a travel concierge service, we aim to cater to any interests and travel styles.

Northwest Nomad: If you had a client who asked for one Washington beach to see, and one only, which would you pick?

Amanda Parshall: Our travel planning service is designed around the idea that no two people are the same or are looking for the same trip experience, so this is a difficult question to answer. But if someone was looking for the iconic Washington coast beach experience, I might recommend Second Beach.

A personal favorite, Second Beach requires a short but scenic hike in, and offers rewards of sea stacks and tidepools. And if you’re lucky, you might catch a glimpse of one of the estimated 800 sea otters that lives on the Quillayute Needles National Wildlife Refuge, which is within eyesight of the beach.

Northwest Nomad: What is something about the Peninsula that you don’t feel gets promoted enough?

Amanda Parshall: I believe one of the more unique attractions in the Peninsula that gets less attention than deserved is the Olympic Discovery Trail.

The trail is a 130-mile path spanning across the Peninsula from Port Townsend to the Pacific Ocean. Whether you’re interested in a multi-day bike tour or a short stroll, the Olympic Discovery Trail is an exceptional way to take in views of old growth forest, snowy mountains and picturesque seascapes.

Northwest Nomad: What annual Port Angeles events do you consider “must see;” or, at least, “really, really should see”?

Amanda Parshall: The Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival in October is a huge event in Port Angeles, and is another great reason to visit the Peninsula in the fall. Not only does the 3-day event highlight a local culinary favorite, it showcases local art, music and cultural activities. If you’re interested in the local scene and love seafood, this event is a must-do!

Northwest Nomad: Is there anything else you’d like to tell people about Rainshadow Escapes?

Amanda Parshall: Rainshadow Escapes makes planning a trip to the Olympic Peninsula easy, whether it’s a quick weekend getaway or a 2-week adventure.

Our Trip Questionnaire makes it simple for you to share your personal interests and travel style, allowing us to customize the itinerary just for you using insider knowledge. The Peninsula is a magical place and we would love the opportunity to share our home with you!

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(All images in this article are property of Amanda Parshall.)

Tour of Washington State Movie and TV Locations Part 3–Twin Peaks at North Bend

Twin Peaks at North Bend: Go for the Novelty, Stay for the Si

North Bend and Twin Peaks will forever be entwined with each other, but even if there’d never been Twin Peaks at North Bend, the town (which is home to Mount Si) would be a fantastic destination.

Si is possibly the most popular mountain hike in the state of Washington. It affords incredible views and has a well-maintained, easy-to-follow trail. Don’t let that fool you, though.

The walk is pretty challenging physically, and I’ve seen a lot of people start it without understanding what they’re getting into.

By all means, do the Si hike before you die, just make sure you’re mentally prepared for it. Also, plan to hike early in the morning before the heat rises.

The fact that Twin Peaks was filmed in North Bend is just the dollop of ice cream atop the cherry pie (see what I did there?).

North Bend and Twin Peaks:

Twede’s Cafe is the Double R from the television show…you know, the one with damn good coffee. The interior is decorated exactly as it is in the series.

The cafe also happens to have some of the best burgers I’ve ever had, and a wide variety of them at that.

Perhaps the weird energy of the show rubbed off on the area, too, because I’ve seen some odd things there, including a man carrying a full-sized tuba up to the top of Mount Si and playing it there.

As noted in the Roslyn entry, you can hit up North Bend and Roslyn in one day. They’re only an hour apart from each other, and doing them both makes for a fun little road trip for television and entertainment buffs.

Tour of Washington State Movie and TV Locations Part 2–Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight at Forks and La Push

Twilight at Forks and La Push, Washington

One of the funniest bumper stickers I’ve ever seen read, “Vampires SUCK…at Forks, Washington.”

The sticker, of course, references Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series.

Like Northern Exposure‘s Roslyn, this is an area that I’m familiar with because I love the area itself. And yes, that is partially my way of saying, I’m not really a Twilight fan (though I did watch the first movie and enjoyed it much more than I thought I would).

While I’m not a big Twilight-head, personally, it’s been fun watching Myers’ vampire-and-werewolf love stories transform the formerly sleepy, way-off-the-beaten-track and not-passionately-sought-out destination of Forks, Washington, into a treasured haven for females of all ages.

The thing that’s sort of odd about Forks and La Push as movie attractions is that none of the films was actually filmed in either of those places, far as I know. That’s not what their claim to fame is.

Rather, the attraction is that the Twilight series was set in a fictional version of Forks, and various Jacob-oriented scenes took place at La Push.

The fact that the area isn’t really featured much in the movies stopped the area from becoming a major attraction for Twilight fans. It also hasn’t stopped the people of these towns from catering to those visitors.

The Pacific Inn Motel, for instance, has special Twilight-themed rooms.

Save on your hotel - www.hotelscombined.com

Beautiful Scenery and Rugged, Fun Hiking

Like most of the other locations I’ll be featuring in this series, Forks and La Push made the list because they are great destinations on their own — even without the movie fanfare. So, when you visit them, you get two wins for the price of one.

La Push has some of the most beautiful beaches you’ll find in the state of Washington. The place is rugged and wild and sparks with elemental energy. View or rocks in the ocean as seen from La Push beach.Forks, too, is an underrated location.

The town itself is rather small with few attractions, but while you’re there, you’re within easy travel distance of rain forests, beaches, and Lake Crescent (with its fabulously terrible Mount Storm King) destinations.

All of those things make Forks a terrific yet relatively little-known base camp for exploring the northwestern corner of this amazing state. It also tends to be affordable for those on budget trips.

La Push accommodations are nice and host spectacular views, but in the peak season can get a bit pricey. Both places are well worth the cost, however, if you’re willing to throw down the quid. It really just boils down to what your budget is at the time you want to visit.

If you drive in to the area from the east, stop by Granny’s Cafe for some of the best food you’ll find on the 101 loop.

Tour of Washington State Movie and TV Shooting Locations Part 1–Northern Exposure in Roslyn

Roslyn, Washington, aka Cicely, Alaska: Home of Northern Exposure

We’re starting with Roslyn, Washington, for two reasons.

First, it’s the town where Northern Exposure — my favorite television series ever — was filmed (check out Moose Chick’s excellent fan site here).

Second, it’s a chill little mountain town smack dab in the middle of the Snoqualmie Pass, which is one of the prettiest drives in the state of Washington. In my opinion, only the White Pass drive can compete with it.

The town shown in Northern Exposure as Cicely, Alaska, is actually Roslyn, Washington. The town hasn’t changed much at all, which is good for visiting because you can see every show-related site in just a couple hours.

It’s been about two months since I was there (August 2017), but as of that time, Dr. Fleishman’s name was still stenciled on the window of his “office,” and a sign still identified Chris in the Morning’s K-BEAR radio room.

The Brick is actually called the Brick, and would be a great bar/restaurant even if it wasn’t associated with the show. The place, built of brick and wood with an enormous bar and full-sized spittoon, is enormous inside and feels like something from the Old West. The whole town feels that way, really. The people of Roslyn are almost universally friendly and easy to talk to, and I’ve had a great experience every time I’ve visited there.

The famous camel mural on the side of Roslyn’s Cafe is also still present. The iconic image in the show was called “Roslyn’s Cafe” because the real cafe was named for the town: ROSLYN (singular) Cafe. Show producers had to cover up for the fact that the town’s name wasn’t actually Cicely, so they added the apostrophe to turn the “Rosyln” into “Rosyln’s.”

Roslyn is a relaxed, quirky town with more than its share of quirky characters…not too unlike our beloved fantasy town of Cicely, Alaska.

You can hit Roslyn and North Bend (discussed below) on the same day without any rush. They are less than an hour of gorgeous driving from each other.

Roslyn was also shown in the 1977 film Joyride and the 2014 film Man in the High Castle.

Aberdeen, Washington: Not the Lying-Down Kind

The city’s bridges sag over their rivers like hunchbacked men carrying too-heavy loads for too long.

On the streets, tired, dim-eyed cars float into mist as a foreign country’s nighttime overtakes everything.

Orange lights glow in pub windows, the buildings thus resembling cooling embers from a scattered fire. They’re the secret hearts of this world carved out of fog, those pubs. Their walls thump with rock, pop, and hip hop.

A tortured, mewling voice echoes faintly through the alleyways. “Come as you are,” it says, “and then be gone with you.”

The whole of Aberdeen sleeps on the threshold of yesterday, dreaming of beds.

In the warm thump of the secret hearts the people laugh. Nothing said ever lasts. Every word fades into fog rolling down out of the mountains.

Yet, for all their subtracted voices, the people stay, and in staying they honor a history of hard work and tough family. Theirs is not a surrendering sadness. No, not that kind.

It’s triumphant and proud, and it laughs. It harvests life out of the hollow and doesn’t give a damn for lying-down things.

Aberdeen is a mother feeding her baby after a double shift. Aberdeen is a grim lumberjack, hands numb with callouses, laughing with abandon as his son tickles his stomach.

Sometimes hobbled, but never cowed, Aberdeen is its people.

“Let’s get to work,” they say. “Our bridges may sag, but they never break — and neither do we.”

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