A Stay at the Cascade River House

A couple weeks ago I wrote about my Diablo Lake Trail and Skagit Trail hikes. In the midst of that, I somehow forgot to write about my excellent stay at the Cascade River House. This must be remedied!

The Cascade River House is located just outside Marblemount, which, with its whopping population of roughly 200 people, is one of my favorite little towns in the state. I thought I grew up deep in the country…then I saw Marblemount and realized I didn’t know what a country town was.

The Cascade River House location is pinned to the map below. It’s relatively easy to find and isn’t far from the town’s two gas stations, so worst comes to worst you can ask directions. Those gas stations are also stocked as little grocery stores, by the way, so you can get supplies there.

The Cascade River House has an actual house, and for people with larger parties I recommend checking it out. What I used was the “luxury” camper trailer parked on the grounds. It was a great compromise between camping and staying in a hotel.

The trailer is tucked behind trees, keeping it visually separated from the house. You don’t feel like you’re sharing property with the people in the house. While I was there, a woman and her two daughters stayed at the house. They stopped by briefly to chat, but other than that I never felt like my peace was ruined by their presence.

The trailer’s got a shower, toilet, and three beds. The kitchen’s got all the basics. None of this mattered a great deal to me, to be honest, as I planned on spending the least amount of time as possible indoors.

What mattered most to me was the grounds, and I wasn’t disappointed. The trailer’s yard’s got a great fire pit with good airflow. The owners keep the place fully stocked with firewood, as well. If you head towards the house itself, you’ll see a big garage, and you can find big stacks of wood behind it.

The river is just over the hill from the trailer. You can hear it flow from the trailer, in fact. The views of the mountains in the distance are stunning. You can fish the river, too, though I personally didn’t do that.

My stay at the Cascade River House was very quiet relaxing. I went through a lot of wood, as is my wont while being outdoors. During the days I went hiking and at night I sat by the fire, enjoyed some Sam Adams Summer Ale, and gazed at the stars with the soothing sound of the river nearby.

If you’re not up for camping but don’t want to stay in a hotel or buy your own trailer, I wholeheartedly recommend the Cascade River House luxury trailer. In fact, after staying in multiple places in Marblemount, I’d give it my highest recommendation (though if you have the chance and the inclination I simply must recommend tent camping there at least once).

For the North Cascades National Park area, I rate it as highly as I rate the Quinalt River Inn for the Lake Quinault area.

Hiking the Diablo Lake Trail at North Cascades National Park

You’d be hard pressed to find any place in Washington state more rugged than North Cascades National Park and its surrounding area. The mountains jut straight up out of the earth, no foothills or gradual incline to speak of. The dramatic landscape makes many of the area’s trails among the most challenging you’ll find. Luckily for those not looking to set their thighs on fire or to take a mallet to their feet, the 7.5-mile-long Diablo Lake Trail is an easier option that nevertheless leads to some beautiful views.

Note that I said “easier” here, not “easy,” which is what some other sites designate the Diablo Lake Trail as. I disagree with that designation, and I base that disagreement on the fact that most of the people I came across on the trail were sweating heavily and asking how much farther they had to go.

Diablo Lake as seen from Diablo Lake Trail.
Diablo Lake as seen from Diablo Lake Trail. You come across this view within the first couple of miles of the trail.

I’m just getting back into hiking shape myself, but I’m not THAT far out of shape, and the trail certainly didn’t feel “easy” for me, just “easier” than the other trails I’ve done in the North Cascades. It’s no Storm King, but it’s no Box Canyon Loop, either.

I’m more apt to lean towards a classification of “moderately difficult” in terms of strenuousness. The Diablo Lake Trail is straightforward, though, and doesn’t have any river crossings or climbs or anything that will test one’s outdoors skills in any serious way (assuming that you don’t sustain some kind of injury, of course).

The trail takes you up the mountain and then down the other side to the shore of Diablo Lake. The lake is artificial, created by Ross Dam, which you can also see while being down by the lake. So, if you’re looking for a feeling of escaping civilization, this trail might not be for you.

Ross Dam as seen from the Diablo Lake Trail. A crane is working on top of the dam.
Ross Dam as seen from the Diablo Lake Trail. It’s somewhat intrusive and maybe an unwelcome reminder of human civilization, but the dam is actually kind of cool looking in and of itself. Quite a feat of engineering.

If you’re just interested in a nice, easier hike with some pretty views, the Diablo Lake Trail is a good choice. It’s not as as easy (and not nearly as short) as something like the Skagit River Trail, however, so there may be better options if you’re looking for something extremely quick and easy.

The trail leads through the base of  a boulder field that offers some interesting views. Another section of the trail leads over an extremely steep slope that drops off and leads a long, long ways down to the water at the bottom of the mountain. The trail is plenty wide at this spot, but people who don’t like heights might find it frightening.

North Cascades National Park is one of the lesser-visited parks in the Pacific Northwest, but its spectacular, rugged scenery shouldn’t be missed. The Diablo Lake Trail is a good starter hike to get to know the area and to get a feel for what it has to offer.